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Start Somewhere.

My daughter knows me well. She went shopping with a friend over Christmas break and came home excited to give me something she knew I would love. She was right. She gifted me a beautifully simple, small binder with bold words adorning the front: start somewhere. An elastic loop was attached just waiting for a beautiful pen to join it. As predicted, I loved it. We talked about how special those words were and how much I believed in them.

My life is busy. I am a literacy teacher educator and work with local school districts as a literacy coach/consultant. I am a writer and am publishing my first book in April. I have three kids who all play travel sports. I have four dogs who need time and attention. I have a husband who works long hours and travels often. And the list continues. I know many of you can relate.

But, I think big. I love imagining and dreaming what life could be, if I only had the time and energy to create it. I am addicted to Pinterest, but rarely actually do anything I pin (except the frozen whipped cream marshmallows made from cookie cutters for hot chocolate. That, I did!) The many goals I set for myself (and my family) can often be the very things that overwhelm me daily and actually cause stress, rather than inspiration. Can you relate?

So, the words ‘start somewhere’ were exactly what I needed as we geared up for the new year. I can set big goals, but the only way to reach them, or even get close to them, is to start somewhere. That, I can do. I can start writing with just one sentence everyday (courtesy of @Kimberlygmoran from the #TeachWrite chat last night!). I can get healthier by drinking one more glass of water. I can build my PLN by sending just one extra tweet. And I can take care of myself with just an extra 15 minutes of sleep.


Start somewhere. Such beautifully simple words to launch me into the new year, confident that I can indeed start somewhere instead of becoming paralyzed later in the year when the large goals I set for myself still seem out of reach. Start somewhere. Comforting words that remind me that as long as I try, I can never fail. Start somewhere. The gift from my daughter to move forward and enjoy the journey wherever somewhere takes me. 

Comments

  1. This is a beautiful post, Stephanie, and a good reminder that the journey begins with the first step. Much luck to you in 2018!

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    1. Thank you for your kind words, Rose. Happy new year!

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  2. Start somewhere. Words I am glad I read today. Thanks for sharing. I am taken with the one sentence idea from last night’s chat, too.

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    1. Have you started it, Diane! I am curious...Are you using an 'old-fashioned' notebook or heading to the computer? I started in Google, but think I might buy a special calendar to write in each day as inspiration. What a gift at the end of the year!

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  3. Start somewhere -- I just love that sentiment. Too often, I wait for the perfect place to start and I never find it. It's more important to just begin and let the rest work itself out. Congratulations on stepping into 2018 full of intention. I'm looking forward to following your journey this year, Stephanie. Happy new year!

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    1. My husband has this wonderfully frustrating manta: He who hesitates, loses. He is constantly telling me to stop waiting and overthinking and just do. I guess I have to admit he is right with this post. =) Happy new year!

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  4. It’s all about starting somewhere, having reasonable expecations, and making it a habit. I’m delighted to learn how you’ve begun your hear, Stephanie. I have a feeling you’re going to create a lot and learn a lot this year!

    BTW: I hope you’ll join us for the 11th Annual March Slice of Life Story Challenge. That’s a great way to keep your writing habit going in the depths of winter!

    -Stacey

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    1. Thank you, Stacey! I have been lurking the annual challenge for quite some time now, but am finally ready to jump in. I'll be there!

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  5. Start somewhere. What a great mantra!
    PS Isn't it wonderful that your daughter knows you so well? That's the best gift of all!

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    1. Oh, you are right, Molly! The best part was that this was a gift from my daughter. She is a wonderful girl who is often my inspiration! Thank you for that reminder!

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  6. I love this entire post! My one little word is STEP but I have yet to write about it. I guess I just need to "start somewhere." I was also intrigued by Kimberly's one sentence tweet. I have decided to write one sentence for each school day left in this year. So, I will have 90 sentences. I chose to keep a notebook on my desk and today, our first day of the semester, I wrote my one little sentence. I am anxious to see how this goes!

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