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#cyberPD Begins!



This summer, I am once again thrilled to be a part of #cyberPD’s summer book study. This is my third year participating and I continue to be amazed at how powerful the experience is. This year, we are reading Dynamic Teaching for Deeper Reading byVicki Vinton. Here is the schedule if you are interested in participating.


The first week of #cyberPD just so happens to be one of the busiest of the summer for me. I am teaching multiple graduate classes in literacy education, finishing my first book with Heinemann Publishers, preparing for #ILA17 and shuttling three children to travel sports competitions. So, as I read this transformative book, I kept thinking about how I could respond to the text #cyberPD style, but still accomplish the other tasks I had set for myself this week. The beauty of #cyberPD is that the experience is personalized for each of us and we all respond in different ways that work best for our own learning. So, this week, I decided to respond to the text by creating an agenda for an upcoming professional development session with elementary teachers based on the content. They have not yet read the book, but I need them to think about the big ideas in the book immediately. So, I created a tentative agenda to share my thinking from the book with them in hopes that it would spark their own inquiry into dynamic teaching for deeper reading. 


Based on the chapters, I planned for activities and discussions that would help teachers reflect on their own reading and classroom practices and grapple with the mismatches that we might discover. While they do not have the book (YET!), they can still think about these important ideas and then continue their learning through Vicki’s helpful videos and blog posts by browsing her blog and the #cyberPD Padlet.


I would love for you to look at the tentative agenda and add in your own thoughts, ideas,questions and comments. How would you share the content of this book with teachers to help transform the reading practices in your school?


Stephanie

Comments

  1. You totally thought outside "the four corners" of Vicki's text to make #cyberPD fit into your already busy life! Your plan looks like a good one! Thanks for the video links on your padlet. I hadn't explored Heinemann's resources yet...now I will!

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    1. Oh, I loved the 'four corners' reference, Mary. Enjoy exploring! I imagine many more will be added this summer.

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  2. Hi Stephanie. I reviewed your tentative agenda and I have one question for you: Do you think when you have teachers read the ‘Number the Stars’ excerpt and reflect on what they did as readers to understand, you might have them try out using one of Vicki's Vinton's practices like the What We Know, What We Wonder chart? This has been very helpful to me in thinking about what I really do as a reader. The next step for me is to think about how I can teach/do this with my students.

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    1. I think this is an excellent idea, Cheryl! I hope that this document grows and changes as I continue reading. I was instantly connecting to the Book-Head-Heart framework from Beers and Probst as well. This might be another good starting point!
      Stephanie

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  3. I am always impressed when a PD opportunity turns into one that helps other educators. I am excited to see your agenda and how you are allowing your learners to learn along with you.

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    1. Thank you for your kind words, Maria. I would love to hear your suggestions!

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  4. So meaningful for you to be able to weave this study in with your challenging summer agenda. For me the point about a learning goal of transference was vital. In addition, the implicit point that we may not merely just pour our students into the workshop model was also of major importance. Best of luck to you over the coming weeks, good to see you back this year. Oh, and thanks for pointing out the Padlet, I wasn't aware of it until now.

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    1. I am glad I could link you to the Padlet, Bret. It is good to see you hear again as well! I was particularly struck by how Vicki said we need to name the goal of transfer for students, which was how this agenda idea actually came to be. For me, this was my immediate transfer where for others, it might be to the classroom. Let's continue on!
      Stephanie

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  5. Hi, Stephanie -
    Thank you for sharing your draft agenda. I also was unaware of the cyberpd padlet. I am not sure if this will fit in anywhere but after the teachers have shared their first draft reading, maybe have them go back and reread the text. Ask if they notice anything new or whether their thinking has changed. Sometimes in the classroom we overlook how sharing our thinking can grow or revise our own.

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  6. Stephanie,
    By now you should be nearing the end of your very busy week, though I would guess you are likely always busy. Like you, the first week of #cyberPD was a busy one for me....but for me it was because of travel. I'm catching up as we drive toward home and was so happy to find your post. You always manage to thoughtfully synthesize the reading and think toward its application. I appreciated the way you started with some big questions and worked toward being able to talk about how these ideas impact our practice. Thank you for sharing your thinking. I always learn so much from you.

    Cathy

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