Skip to main content

DIY Literacy with #cyberPD



Summer is a time to renew, to re-energize and to connect with other educators as we work to rethink our practices for a new school year. The #cyberPD group meets every July to choose and discuss a professional text together. This year, the group chose DIY Literacy written by Kate Roberts & Maggie Beattie Roberts and this post is a kick off to the month-long event. If you have not had the chance to read this book, I highly recommend doing so. Simply put, it is inspiring, and reminds teachers that we do indeed have the power to change the trajectory of students’ instructional lives.
As a literacy teacher educator and literacy coach, I often take a different stance than most of the teachers and literacy specialists participating in the group. I am constantly thinking about how to engage my preservice and inservice teachers in the content of our field in particular, strategic and engaging ways so they can see immediate application to their own classrooms. This book has already challenged me to think, and rethink, my practices and ensure that I am empowering my teachers to believe that they too have the knowledge and know-how to teach the students they have in front of them. 

The idea behind the book is that we all can ‘do literacy ourselves’ given our teaching expertise, our knowledge of our students and our motivation to ensure student learning. In a Pinterest and Teachers Pay Teachers world, we tend to think that our work must be packaged and pretty to have merit, but learning, and the artifacts, of it, are messy. The teaching tools do not have to be perfect, they need to be useful. The tools in our actual garage toolbox, if used, are not polished and shiny. They are dirty, messy and banged up, proud signs of accomplishment. So I ask myself, am I ensuring that my teachers understand this important idea?

My mantra for my teachers comes from a colleague, Cheryl Dozier: The one who does the work does the learning. This book embodies that concept. As a teacher educator, I create learning opportunities for my teachers to seek out the advice of others, hit the books and go online for ways to strengthen our teacher knowledge and find strategies for their students. We utilize The Reading Strategies book and think carefully about planning instruction for students. But, I do not teach them how to mine their own work for strategies…..yet. This was a critical realization for me.  How can I cultivate the DIY spirit in my literacy teacher education classes and coaching? Well, I need to first remember my own mantra: the one that does the work does the learning. While there is merit in showing students the many resources available for literacy instruction, I am doing them a disservice if I am not empowering them to realize that they can actually create their own for even more powerful results. But, before we create, we must remember that we are readers and writers first. The underlying principles of reading and writing workshop are hard at work in this book. 

Inspired, I plan to create my own arsenal of resources for literacy coaches and teacher educators. I can easily envision myself creating short video clips that show teachers: 
  • How to cultivate a reading life and start a reading notebook
  • How to write each and every day, even if only on a sticky note, and build a collection of texts for demonstration notebooks
  • How to write strategies with a focus on what, how and why. (I am really good at teaching them the ‘what’, but the ‘how’ is something I need them to grapple with, instead of providing resources that do the work for them.)
  • What the teaching tools are: teaching charts, demonstration notebooks, micro-progressions of skills and bookmarks.


I could also envision class activities where we create teaching charts together and create our own demonstration notebooks for our practicums. I think the micro-progressions have particular importance in teacher education. My students need to know that learning progressions are available for support, but ultimately, we need to articulate this trajectory of development for ourselves if we are going to effectively teach students along a developmental continuum. 

I have one more idea I am eager to try: bookmarks. While it might seem odd at first, I really like the idea of having my graduate students choose their own goals and make them visible. Perhaps they need or want to learn more about writing mini-lessons, or word study or even how to match books to readers. By choosing a goal and make it visible to others, we strive to reach it. 

There is so much to ponder and think about. Now, I need to actually take a risk and try some of these ideas. Stay tuned!

Stephanie

Comments

  1. Can't wait to see what you come up with Stephanie! You always have great ideas! I think you said it perfectly... Pinterest and TPT have so many thinking that we need these beautiful polished brilliant "tools" and resources... Sometimes inventing that "wheel" ourselves is just more meaningful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Heidi! I have some ideas, especially after chapters 3 and 4. Stay tuned!

      Delete
  2. Yes, we do need to use these tools ourselves. We all have literacy goals and challenges- whether it is to expand our reading lives or write better dialogue.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Kate,

      LitProf Suz made a great point in her post: What charts and posters do we have up in our own office or work space? These serve the same function for as as these DIY charts do for kids. Love it!

      Stephanie

      Delete
  3. As a literacy coach myself, so much of what you say resonates with me. I love your point about Pinterest and TPT...I often say that very same thing! Looking forward to the rest of your reflections this month.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Marcie! I have a literacy coach Google Community focused on coaching and using technology to better connect and collaborate with teachers. Let me know if you are interested!

      Stephanie

      Delete
  4. Yes! I read PD books with a similar lens--how can I use the ideas myself but even more, how can I introduce these ideas to my pre-service teachers. I have been thinking about ways to perhaps remove the reflective essays my methods courses currently end with and add some of these teaching tools instead, as I think it would be much more beneficial and meaningful for students to create tools that they can then use in their own classrooms. I enjoyed reading your thoughts!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Elisabeth,

      I am thinking of the same thing. I have many reflective pieces, but need to have students get messy in the work themselves..and then have them reflect. I will share a few ideas in my next response!

      Stephanie

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

An Instructional Coaching Toolkit!

I have a thing for notebooks. And colorful markers. And sticky notes. I use them in all aspects of my literacy teaching and coaching. During coaching conversations, I often find myself providing on-the-spot demonstrations with these tools. I might engage teachers in a brief lesson on phonemic awareness and ask them to sort sounds. I might walk teachers through word building activities so they experience a new way of engaging students. I might introduce books to teachers to model how they might do the same for their students. I might even create game boards on sticky notes as visuals for teachers to support instructional planning. These demonstrations and notes act as instant and tangible tools to further teacher learning.
Over the years, I’ve compiled these artifacts to create coaching toolkits for the teachers I work with. My toolkit for ‘word work’ might include a picture of an anchor chart created with students, a list of words appropriate to the alphabetic feature students are wor…

Focus on Coaching Cycles

At this point in the school year, many of us are deep into our classroom coaching and engaging in coaching cycles with teachers. Just as coaching can look unique from building to building, our coaching cycles are often unique to our coaching context, our purpose for partnering and the goals and needs of each individual teacher: 1:1 coaching cycles, small group coaching cycles, student-centered coaching cycles and more. Each cycle typically has a pre-coaching conversation, classroom coaching/co-teaching/observation and then follow-up conversations as well.You can find theforms and templates I tend to use for classroom coaching here.
For me, my coaching cycles right now are in the context of my graduate education courses. Each week, I engage in a single coaching cycle with each of my students: lesson planning, observing lessons and coaching conversations. We repeat this for ten weeks of the course and the focus of our cycles shift and change over time. We also meet for small-group coac…

Leading By Learning

This summer, I vowed to be intentional in how I spent my time so that when the new school year arrived, I would feel refreshed and renewed. Admittedly, the summer seemed to fly by, but I did carve out time for my own professional learning. I read every day, I wrote in my notebook (almost) daily, tried my hand at gardening, spent time with my kids and just tried to get better at being me. Some days, I killed it. And other days, well….you know. So, as I head into another school year, I know that I need to be incredibly intentional in how I spend my time and ensure that I focus on my own learning as an educator. It is this learning that fuels my work: it lifts my reading spirits, fuels my writing heart and reminds me that leading the learning of others requires that I remain a continual learner myself.
It is this core belief that drives my teaching, coaching and leading this year. I am even more committed to my own professional learning to fuel my work and lead by example. I have purpose…